1. 10:03 25th Jul 2014

    Notes: 6575

    Reblogged from luciferandleviathans

    (Source: lotrdaily)

     
  2. 10:03

    Notes: 21094

    Reblogged from thejeniverse

    Tags: vaccines

    Anonymous said: Shut the fuck up about vaccinations. Not everyone has to have them, not everyone believes in them. Uneducated fuck.

    aspiringdoctors:

    restless-wafarer:

    aspiringdoctors:

    image

    You know, my homie and secret best friend Neil deGrasse Tyson said it best….

    image

    This isn’t an issue of belief or should even be up for discussion. It’s not a debate- like gravity or that the Earth revolves around the Sun isn’t up for debate. It’s a fact, whether or not you like it. Sorry bro.

    And any ‘educated fuck’ knows that vaccines are necessary and everyone who can have them should have them.

    Have a lovely day, sugar. 

    Actually there’s a lot of research and knowledge supporting the fact that vaccines are NOT necessary. It is simply another thing that today’s health system is super big on, just like hospital births and c-sections. And a lot of people actually have long term and short term complications from getting vaccines. Ahem.

    Dang guys, you thought I didn’t check my activity log every now and then? Because I knew shit like this would pop up. And, I just finished my block exam and am feeling fiesty.

    Actually you’re wrong. That ‘research’ is either completely fabricated OR grossly misinterprets the data OR uses shitty research techniques to get the data they want- all which are grossly unethical, in case you’re curious. I’ve got slides from a recent lecture on vaccines (aka why I am so fired up about this nonsense). You can check out the citations on each slide if you don’t believe me… something unsurprisingly missing from literally every anti-vaccine comment I’ve gotten and website that I have visited. Show me your sources, honey, and if you do, I will blow them out of the water because not a single one stands up to current scientific research standards.

    There are however tomes and tomes of research for the safety end efficacy of vaccines. Don’t believe me? Look at a simple google scholar search.

    So! Here we go! 

    image

    image

    Holy shit, it’s almost like vaccines SAVE SOCIETY MONEY. In fact, they give money back to society, along with the other programs indicated by red arrows. Which would be really weird for something that is just a healthcare fad like c-sections and hospital births.

    And most people have no complications for getting vaccines, and if they do, most of them are short term. In fact, it is devilishly hard to prove an adverse effect was because of a vaccine. Why? Because it’s how we’re wired. We falsely see connections and causes where there are none (called a type 1 error; you are rejecting a true null hypothesis). People are more likely to attribute an adverse health event to a shot- even if that shot is the placebo and the numbers are just the background rate for whatever health event in the population.

    image

    And here is a graph showing the sample sizes necessary to prove that an adverse event is caused or related to a vaccine.

    image

    You know what, it was a really good lecture and I’m going to share more more relevant slides in case any one else feels like contradicting me.

    These slides show the public health impact of vaccines. Note the differences between the historical peak and post-vaccine era deaths columns. Because saving literally thousands of lives is totally a conspiracy you should beware of.

    image

    image

    And this is why herd immunity is so important! See how high it has to be for measles? Guess what we’re seeing outbreaks of thanks to anti-vaxxers? Don’t forget that one of the deadly complications of measles is SSPE.

    image

    Look how Hepatitis A infections in older adults when down after kids started getting immunized. Shocking! Could vaccines be… good for …. everyone????

    image

    Ahem.

     
  3. 09:59

    Notes: 280149

    Reblogged from luciferandleviathans

    preppycollegeguy:

    Marilyn knew what was up

    (Source: ourmarilynmonroe)

     
  4. 09:58

    Notes: 332495

    Reblogged from axon-axoff

    axon-axoff:

whycantibe1oftheoneswithacoolurl:

schrodingerscatisdead:

me at pokemon daycare

I had to reblog this again

Is that a Mandibuzz or a semi-decapitated Doduo?

    axon-axoff:

    whycantibe1oftheoneswithacoolurl:

    schrodingerscatisdead:

    me at pokemon daycare

    I had to reblog this again

    Is that a Mandibuzz or a semi-decapitated Doduo?

     
  5. 10:21 19th Jul 2014

    Notes: 267

    Reblogged from tlotrgifs

    Giant Water Bug

    (Source: dominicmonaghans)

     
  6. 10:19

    Notes: 1323

    Reblogged from luciferandleviathans

    image: Download

    mstrkrftz:

God's Creation by Samuel Domingues
     
  7. 10:18

    Notes: 3428

    Reblogged from lookatthislittlething

    mashable:

    The Ultimate World Cup 2014 Highlights (Cat Edition)

    This is your World Cup recap. And by “recap,” we mean cats playing soccer. (Oops! We mean “football”, fancy people.) 

     
  8. 21:54 17th Jul 2014

    Notes: 130674

    Reblogged from markct

    Tangible Media

    MIT’s Tangible Media is coming along nicely,

    "Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that’s only the beginning."

    (Source: youtube.com)

     
  9. 21:54

    Notes: 6299

    Reblogged from thefrogman

    Tags: photography

    image: Download

    thefrogman:

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure: The beginning of a great photoSill Level: Beginner
Getting a proper exposure is at the heart of all photography. I will now attempt to explain it in the simplest terms possible.
The Basics
You camera has a sensor.

This sensor collects light. Too much light and the image is bright or “overexposed.” Not enough light and your image is dark or “underexposed.”

There are 3 main elements that determine your exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. 
Aperture
The aperture is just an adjustable hole inside your lens that lets in light.

The bigger the hole, the more light it can let in. The smaller the hole, the less light it can let in.
Aperture is measured in f-stops. This indicates the size of the hole. Though it seems backwards, a lower number means a bigger hole. A higher number means a smaller hole.

Your lens will be rated with its maximum aperture. So if it is a “17-55mm f/4 lens”—that means f/4 is the biggest hole it can make. Most lenses can go to f/22, which would be the smallest hole it can make.
A “fast lens” is one that has a very large maximum aperture. These lenses have an f-stop of 2.8 or lower. They are great for doing photography in low light. 
A large aperture (low f-stop number) can also give you shallow depth of field. This allows you to make your background blurry to better isolate your subjects. 

This is a very desirable thing for many photographers, so they try to get the fastest lens they can. 
Shutter Speed
Shutter speed is how long your sensor is exposed to light. Think of two sliding doors in front of the sensor. They open, let in light, and then close. A fast shutter speed lets in very little light. A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light.
Shutter speed is measured in seconds. A fast shutter speed will be a fractional value, like 1/500th of a second. A slow shutter speed can be entire seconds.
Your camera might display fractions as just the bottom number in the fraction. So 1/500th would just show as 500. Whole seconds will have a double quotation mark after. So 5 seconds will appear as 5”. 
Faster shutter speeds let in less light, but will allow you to freeze action.

Slower shutter speeds let in more light, allowing you to take images in darker environments. With a long enough exposure, you can make night look like day. 

With slow shutter speeds you risk your image blurring due to your hands shaking the camera or movement of the subjects in your photos. So if you do a long exposure, you will almost certainly need a very still subject and a tripod.
There is a formula for keeping camera shake from blurring your photo. You just put 1 over the length of your lens. So if your lens is 50mm, you need a shutter speed of 1/50th or faster. Note: This will not stop blurring due to your subject moving. 
ISO
ISO is the amplification of your sensor. Similar to the volume knob on your radio, ISO amplifies the sensitivity of the sensor so you can increase your shutter speed or make your aperture smaller. It makes the light “louder.” However, this can come at a cost. The more you amplify the sensor, the more noise will show up in your image.

Some cameras can go to a very high ISO and have very little noise. These cameras are usually frickin’ expensive. As technology advances, cheaper cameras get better and have less noise at higher ISOs.
Getting the Balance
A proper exposure requires balancing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to get your desired result.
To get shallow depth of field you’ll need a large aperture. So you make your f-stop the lowest number possible. But that lets in a lot of light, so you need a fast shutter speed to balance it out. 
To take a long exposure, your shutter speed will now let in a ton of light. To keep from overexposing you may need to make your aperture very small so the image does not overexpose. 
If it is darker and things are moving, you’ll need a fast shutter speed and a large aperture. But you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blur. So you raise your ISO to amplify the light, allow you to get the proper exposure, and keep your subjects from blurring. Yes, it will cause your image to have some noise, but it is a worthy compromise to get the image you desire. 
Photography is often about making compromises. Sacrificing a little bit of quality in one area to create the intended effect with a proper exposure. Learning this balancing act can take years to truly master and in further posts I will go deeper into how to figure out how to get the best exposure possible for any situation. 
TL;DR
Exposure is the amount of light captured on your sensor or film
Not enough light = underexposed
Too much light = overexposed
Aperture is the hole in your lens that lets in different amounts of light
A large hole is a small f-stop
A small hole is a large f-stop
A large hole creates shallow depth of field (sharp subject, blurry background)
A shutter opens and closes to expose your sensor for different amounts of time
A fast shutter speed freezes motion, but lets in less light
A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light, but can cause motion blur if subject is not still
ISO is the amplification of the sensor
HIGH ISO makes the image brighter, but creates noise
LOW ISO makes the image darker, but gives you the cleanest result
Photos by Froggie
You can find me here: [tumblr | wishlist]

This is an example of the tutorial style posts you can find on the newly launched Frogman’s Light School. Eventually, we will cover a variety of topics at every skill level, from beginner to advanced, so keep checking back.
If you’ve been wanting to brush up on your photography skills, follow along!

    thefrogman:

    frogmanslightschool:

    Exposure: The beginning of a great photo
    Sill Level: Beginner

    Getting a proper exposure is at the heart of all photography. I will now attempt to explain it in the simplest terms possible.

    The Basics

    You camera has a sensor.

    image

    This sensor collects light. Too much light and the image is bright or “overexposed.” Not enough light and your image is dark or “underexposed.”

    image

    There are 3 main elements that determine your exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. 

    Aperture

    The aperture is just an adjustable hole inside your lens that lets in light.

    image

    The bigger the hole, the more light it can let in. The smaller the hole, the less light it can let in.

    Aperture is measured in f-stops. This indicates the size of the hole. Though it seems backwards, a lower number means a bigger hole. A higher number means a smaller hole.

    image

    Your lens will be rated with its maximum aperture. So if it is a “17-55mm f/4 lens”—that means f/4 is the biggest hole it can make. Most lenses can go to f/22, which would be the smallest hole it can make.

    A “fast lens” is one that has a very large maximum aperture. These lenses have an f-stop of 2.8 or lower. They are great for doing photography in low light. 

    A large aperture (low f-stop number) can also give you shallow depth of field. This allows you to make your background blurry to better isolate your subjects. 

    image

    This is a very desirable thing for many photographers, so they try to get the fastest lens they can. 

    Shutter Speed

    Shutter speed is how long your sensor is exposed to light. Think of two sliding doors in front of the sensor. They open, let in light, and then close. A fast shutter speed lets in very little light. A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light.

    Shutter speed is measured in seconds. A fast shutter speed will be a fractional value, like 1/500th of a second. A slow shutter speed can be entire seconds.

    Your camera might display fractions as just the bottom number in the fraction. So 1/500th would just show as 500. Whole seconds will have a double quotation mark after. So 5 seconds will appear as 5”. 

    Faster shutter speeds let in less light, but will allow you to freeze action.

    image

    Slower shutter speeds let in more light, allowing you to take images in darker environments. With a long enough exposure, you can make night look like day. 

    image

    With slow shutter speeds you risk your image blurring due to your hands shaking the camera or movement of the subjects in your photos. So if you do a long exposure, you will almost certainly need a very still subject and a tripod.

    There is a formula for keeping camera shake from blurring your photo. You just put 1 over the length of your lens. So if your lens is 50mm, you need a shutter speed of 1/50th or faster. Note: This will not stop blurring due to your subject moving. 

    ISO

    ISO is the amplification of your sensor. Similar to the volume knob on your radio, ISO amplifies the sensitivity of the sensor so you can increase your shutter speed or make your aperture smaller. It makes the light “louder.” However, this can come at a cost. The more you amplify the sensor, the more noise will show up in your image.

    image

    Some cameras can go to a very high ISO and have very little noise. These cameras are usually frickin’ expensive. As technology advances, cheaper cameras get better and have less noise at higher ISOs.

    Getting the Balance

    A proper exposure requires balancing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to get your desired result.

    To get shallow depth of field you’ll need a large aperture. So you make your f-stop the lowest number possible. But that lets in a lot of light, so you need a fast shutter speed to balance it out. 

    To take a long exposure, your shutter speed will now let in a ton of light. To keep from overexposing you may need to make your aperture very small so the image does not overexpose. 

    If it is darker and things are moving, you’ll need a fast shutter speed and a large aperture. But you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blur. So you raise your ISO to amplify the light, allow you to get the proper exposure, and keep your subjects from blurring. Yes, it will cause your image to have some noise, but it is a worthy compromise to get the image you desire. 

    Photography is often about making compromises. Sacrificing a little bit of quality in one area to create the intended effect with a proper exposure. Learning this balancing act can take years to truly master and in further posts I will go deeper into how to figure out how to get the best exposure possible for any situation. 

    TL;DR

    • Exposure is the amount of light captured on your sensor or film
    • Not enough light = underexposed
    • Too much light = overexposed
    • Aperture is the hole in your lens that lets in different amounts of light
    • A large hole is a small f-stop
    • A small hole is a large f-stop
    • A large hole creates shallow depth of field (sharp subject, blurry background)
    • A shutter opens and closes to expose your sensor for different amounts of time
    • A fast shutter speed freezes motion, but lets in less light
    • A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light, but can cause motion blur if subject is not still
    • ISO is the amplification of the sensor
    • HIGH ISO makes the image brighter, but creates noise
    • LOW ISO makes the image darker, but gives you the cleanest result

    Photos by Froggie

    You can find me here: [tumblr wishlist]

    This is an example of the tutorial style posts you can find on the newly launched Frogman’s Light School. Eventually, we will cover a variety of topics at every skill level, from beginner to advanced, so keep checking back.

    If you’ve been wanting to brush up on your photography skills, follow along!

     
  10. Narayane is loudly unrepentant. “I’m not scared. I’m not ashamed,” she says. “We’ve done a good thing for society. We will see whether society repays us”.